News

  • The Map as Narrative: Cartographic Evolution of Parisian Space, 1836–2015

    The Map as Narrative

    In this display, based on the honors thesis of Hannah Benson, Class of 2017, the map is seen as a text or narrative which tells the story of a space and the people who live and work in it. “The narrative qualities of the map,” Ms. Benson says, “document physical and mental motion, reflect temporality and memory, and allow the map to recount how space is lived rather than how it is conceived.” On a visit to Paris, she asked Parisians to complete a blank map of the city in whatever way reflected their conception of Paris. The exhibition combines a selection of these personal maps with guidebooks and maps of Paris from the Chapin Library’s collections.

    Feb 27 through March 31, 2017 | Instruction Gallery (Sawyer 408)

  • Raising Multilingual Children: Nature AND Nurture

    Barbara Pearson

    Barbara Zurer Pearson has been doing research on bilingual child language for 30 years, first at the University of Miami and more recently at UMass Amherst. She also collects stories and advice from parents all over the world who are raising multilingual children. In this interactive talk, she will share research findings and use a case-study approach to explore alternative strategies and solutions for real-life situations.

    Thursday, April 6 at 4:00pm | Griffin 3

    Sponsored by the Department of Romance Languages and the Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

  • Mapping the Realm of Islam / تصوير مملكة الاسلام

    Map of Mekka

    Professor Zayde Antrim (Trinity College) will introduce in this lecture the earliest and most enduring mapping tradition devoted to representing a superregion shaped by Islamic civilization. Emerging from the context of early Arabic geographical writing, the maps that make up this tradition were simultaneously a product of and argument for the diversity of the “realm of Islam” as consolidated by Muslim rulers between the eighth and tenth centuries, as well as its internal and external connectivity.

    Griffin Hall, 7 | Wednesday, April 12 at 6:00pm to 7:00pm

    Sponsored by Arabic Studies, History, Global Studies, Religion, Spanish, and Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

  • The Origin of Japanese Cuisine in World War II

    "Eat everything!" Poster

    One of the leading scholars on Japanese food culture/history, Eric Rath, will make a class visit to JAPN223 Japanese Food Culture in a Global Context. In addition, he will give a public talk on Japan’s cuisines.

    Schapiro 129 | April 13 , 4:15 pm

    Sponsored by Japanese Program Tompkins Fund, Asian Studies Department, the Lecture Committee, and Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures.

  • Afro Cuban Ritual Practices: Ifa and Santeria

    Yesenia

    Victor Betancourt and Yesenia Fernández Selier will introduce the general public to the Afro-Cuban Yoruba Culture, the Afro-Caribbean religions and their significance as "time capsules" of identity. Afro Cuban ritual practices were for centuries considered atavist and barbaric, transmitted through oral tradition and hidden from mainstream culture. However, lately there has been a renascence of interest by scholars and the general public with an outstanding transitional network of practitioners and religious families. Victor Betancourt will discuss tthe main transformations of the Ifa and Santeria transnational practices.

    Betancourt is the founder and Head of Ifa Iranlowo Temple in Havana, and he pioneers the creation of Santero and Babalawos Schools. He also supports the formation of the national organization of Ifa priestess, "Hermanas Universales."He has authored many books on Ifa and Santeria.

    Wednesday, April 19 at 4:15pm to 5:45pm | Hollander Hall, 241

    Sponsored by Dance, Africana Studies, Anthropology & Sociology, Global Studies, Religion, Davis Center, Spanish, Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures

  • Reading for Pleasure: Romance Fiction in the International Marketplace

    Reading for Pleasure

    Conference kicks off on Friday, April 21 with a screening of Love Between the Covers followed by Q&A with director Laurie Kahn, author Eloisa James (Mary Bly), and author/publisher Radclyffe (Len Barot). This event is free and open to the public. The conference continues through Sunday, April 23 with several other public events. → "Reading for Pleasure" conference website

    Sponsored by Romance Writers of America; The Oakley Center for the Humanities and Social Sciences; The Center for Foreign Languages, Literatures, and Cultures; the Departments of German and Russian, Romance Languages, and English; the Programs in Women’s, Gender, and Sexuality Studies and Leadership Studies; and the Michael Dively ’61 Lecture Committee for Human Sexuality and Diversity.


Activities

Kyoto Travel Course (Winter 2017)

In January 2017, the Japanese program offered a travel course to Japan, Kyoto Artisans: Exploring 1200 years of Cultural History of Kyoto through Modern Craftsmanship. Prof. Yamamoto led eight students to Kyoto to explore the cultural history of Kyoto. The group visited artisan studios and interviewed a Buddhist statue sculptor, a sacred mirror maker, a Nishijin weaver, a dyer, a traditional textile patternner, a tea master and a Noh performer. They learned how traditional craftsmanship and art forms have been perpetuated and transformed in a modern era as the city of Kyoto developed. At the end of the trip, students held a public presentation and shared their research on craftsmanship and reflections with Kyoto audience.

→ Visit students’ daily journals

AnnouncementsActivitiesGeneral Interests

Activities

  • Kyoto Travel Course (Winter 2017)

    In January 2017, the Japanese program offered a travel course to Japan, Kyoto Artisans: Exploring 1200 years of Cultural History of Kyoto through Modern Craftsmanship. Prof. Yamamoto led eight students to Kyoto to explore the cultural history of Kyoto. The group visited artisan studios and interviewed a Buddhist statue sculptor, a sacred mirror maker, a Nishijin weaver, a dyer, a traditional textile patternner, a tea master and a Noh performer. They learned how traditional craftsmanship and art forms have been perpetuated and transformed in a modern era as the city of Kyoto developed. At the end of the trip, students held a public presentation and shared their research on craftsmanship and reflections with Kyoto audience.
  • Celebrating Japanese Culture at Clark

    Celebrating Japanese Culture at Clark

    On Feb. 5, a Japanese Calligraphy –*SHODO demonstration and workshop by Ms. Masako Inkyo was held. Thirteen students from the Japanese program participated in the workshop.

    *Shodo is an art form using a brush and charcoal ink on paper, wood plaques and fabric. It includes Chinese characters (kanji) and Japanese hiragana. Although it originated in the techniques used for letter writing, with its unique form of expression it has developed into an art genre.