New Faculty in Academic Year 2018-2019

CCFLLC welcomes new faculty with visiting positions in German, Russian and Chinese. You can check out the courses they will be offering and learn about their teaching and research interests.


Jason Cieply

Jason Cieply

  • RUSS 277 (F) The Self Under Stalin: a Geneology of Soviet Subjectivity
  • RUSS 204 (S) Russia’s Long Revolution: A Survey of Twentieth- and Twenty-First-Century Russian Cultures

Jason Cieply is an enthusiast of Russian culture interested in the ways revolution makes us think, feel, and speak. He completed his PhD in Slavic Languages and Literatures at Stanford University in 2016 and is currently at work on his book project, Voices of Enthusiasm: Revolutionary Emotion and Interclass Imitation in Soviet Narrative Fiction. His research explores one state of mind historically associated with revolutionary societies — enthusiasm  — and the Soviet artists, who shaped and were shaped by it in the first years of the Soviet project.  At Williams Cieply is teaching two courses focusing on the relationship between artistic experimentation, revolutionary politics, and subjectivity in twentieth-century Russian culture, as well as courses in Russian language. His recent publications include the article, “The Silent Side of Polyphony: On the Disappearances of ‘Silentium!’ from the Drafts of Dostoevskii and Bakhtin” (Slavic Review).

 

Brahim El Guabli

Brahim El Guabli

  • ARAB 249 / COMP 249 (F) Trauma and Memory in Maghrebi and Middle Eastern Literatures
  • ARAB 420 (F) Current Events from the Maghreb and the Middle East
  • ARAB 209 (S) Saharan Imaginations

Brahim El Guabli was born and raised in a rural Berber village in the South of Morocco. His dissertation entitled “The Minor Re-writes the Nation: Memory of Loss, Archives, Historiography and State Cooptation in Morocco” investigates Moroccan literature’s engagement with the traumatic legacies of what came to be known as the “years of lead” in Morocco (1956-1999). Drawing on texts written in French and Arabic, Brahim probes how testimony and memory dialogue with, contest, and unsettle both the historiography and historiographical production of post-independence Morocco. Using an interdisciplinary approach to conduct a new reading of an important corpus of novels and memoirs, Brahim places questions of loss, agency, citizenship and historiographical justice at the center of trauma and trauma narratives as they pertain to the situation in Morocco. Brahim’s work has appeared in Arab Studies Journal, The Journal of North African Studies and Francosphères. He is also the co-editor of the forthcoming special issue of The Journal of North African Studies entitled “Violence and the Politics of Aesthetics: A Postcolonial Maghreb Without Borders.”

 

Lu Kou

Lu Kou

  • CHIN/COMP 225 (F): The Fantastic in Chinese Literature
  • CHIN 420 (S): Masterpieces in Modern Chinese Literature

Lu Kou will receive his Ph.D. in pre-modern Chinese literature in May 2018 from Harvard University with a secondary field in Classical Philology. Lu’s research interests include medieval Chinese literature and culture, adaptations of classical tales in vernacular genres and modern media, and comparative studies of Chinese Middle Period and medieval Europe. His dissertation project, “Courtly Exchange and the Rhetoric of Legitimacy in Early Medieval China,” examines the power of rhetoric to construct royal authority in the period of division (known as the Northern and Southern Dynasties, 420–589), when several rival states competed for dominance. It explores how “words” can be used as a weapon to participate in the power struggle and shape people’s perception of the reality. His next project on early medieval historiography, specifically, the polemic nature of history writing, investigates the flimsy boundary between historical truth and literary imagination. Lu’s teaching interests include Chinese poetry, fantastic narratives, and Chinese language, with a particular interest in the transformation of pre-modern literature in the modern/contemporary world.

 

Natalie Lozinski-Veach

Natalie Lozinski-Veach

  • GERM 118 (F) Animal Subjects (tutorial)
  • GERM 210 (S) Stranger Things: The German Novella

Natalie Lozinski-Veach completed her Ph.D. in Comparative Literature at Brown University in 2016. Her research explores the intersections of language, animal studies, and aesthetics in modern German and Polish literature and theory. Additional teaching and research interests include Holocaust and trauma studies, gender, posthumanism, critical and literary theory, and film. Most recently, she has published the article “Embodied Nothings: Paul Celan’s Creaturely Inclinations” in the journal MLN.