French

Bethel Shekour ’19 explores the warp and weft of the Ethiopian community in Paris

“I was able to probe the following questions regarding the role of food in Ethiopian communities in Paris: where are Ethiopian food vendors located and do they cater to communities outside of their own? What do they communicate through their decor, music and advertisements to those from their own community and to those outside the community? Are there other social determinants that play a part in Ethiopian communities?”

Bethel-Shekour-Friedberg-Report-2019

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Friedberg Memorial Travel Fellowship (apply by Tues, April 30)

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Merudjina Normil ’19 explores the work of Senegalese women filmmakers and the lives of Senegalese migrants and Afro-French people in Paris

“After an amazing abroad experience in Dakar, Senegal researching the place of women in film, I wanted to push my research towards a different francophone context with the same subject. Thanks to the Marguerite W. Friedberg Award, I could afford to conduct research on Afro-French and Franco-Senegalese women filmmakers in Paris to see if/how they

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Julian Smedley ’19 researches immigrant cuisine in Paris: how it is regarded, and how it tastes (c’est délicieux!)

Julian Smedley( on the left) in Le Grand Bol Chinese restaurant

“There is clearly a difference between how the average “Français de souche” conceives of immigrant cuisine and how French chefs do so. The conception of immigrant cuisine as lower class means that immigrant restaurants have to price lower to bring in customers. This is unfortunate, as the soft, delicate cockles I ate at Le Grand Bol far surpassed the tough, greasy and more expensive escargot I ate at a French bistro the next day.”

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French Film Festival 2019 / Transitions: Coming of Age in French and Francophone Adolescent Film

French Film Festival, 2019

This year’s French Film Festival begins with L’homme sur les quais / The Man by the Shore. Haitian filmmaker Raoul Peck, who later went on to become the nation’s Minister of Culture, directed this drama that examines the violence and instability of his country’s darkest days, the 60s. The story follows an 8-year old girl, whose parents had to flee from the dictator Duvalier and the Tontons Macoutes. Left in the care of her grandmother, she creates a fantasy world of her own to escape the violence and tyranny that surrounds her. [In French with English subtitles.]
The French Film Festival 2019 continues on

❖ Feb. 11 with L’homme sur les quais (The Man by the Shore) (1993) by Raoul Peck.
In French and Kreyol with English subtitles. 106 mins.

❖ Feb. 18 , at 7 p.m.: with short film Maman(s)/Mothers(s) (2015) by Maïmouna Doucouré.
In French and Wolof with English subtitles. 21 mins.
Feb. 18 , at 7 p.m. (following Maman(s))
Tomboy (2011) by Céline Sciamma (Water Lilies, Girlhood)
In French with English subtitles. 82 mins.

❖ Feb. 25 with Polina, dansersa vie (Polina) (2015) by Angelin Preljocaj and Valérie Müller.
In Russian and French with English subtitles. 108 mins.

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Goûter français

Goûter français

The Goûter, a very traditional sweet meal between lunch and dinner, was organized by the French TAs and the French Club. It took place on Sunday, 14th of October in the third floor of Hollander. The students have had the chance to taste pastries from France: pain au chocolat, croissants, macarons, and other pâtisseries.

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Ryan Buggy ’19 meets Les Sweet Simones and La Big Bertha: a study of the fascinating world of the neo-burlesque

Ryan Buggy

“The time that I spent in Paris going to burlesque shows and meeting artists helped me understand the power of this genre of performance. Burlesque is a tool of empowerment: performers and audiences alike get to experience a space where different bodies and sexualities are applauded, and where artists can engage with subjects as complex as misogyny, racism, and homophobia in comical yet critical ways. At a neo-burlesque show, you will meet mothers, survivors, queer people, and other diverse performers who take to the stage and undress not only their clothing but also the bigotry and challenges they face in their everyday lives. It is an international art; burlesque was born in the Parisian cabaret, but resurrected in New York only to travel back across the ocean to French stages.”

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French Game Night

French Game Night. Sept 27, 2018

On Thursday, September 27, the French Game Night took place in Hollander 229 from 7 to 8:30 PM. Students sat at five tables with different card games on set up on each one of them: “Jungle Speed”, “Salade de Cafards”, “Taboo”, “La Bataille Corse” and “Le président”.

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Remembering the Great War

Remembering the Great War

Remembrance and Forgetting: The Great War in France
Susan McCready, University of Southern Alabama
October 10, Griffin 3, 6 PM

German Society and Politics during the First Total War, 1914 – 1918
Raffael Scheck, Colby College
October 23, Griffin 3, 6:30 PM

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Alexia Barandiaran ’19 explores French ballet history in and out of her ballet shoes

Alexia Barandiaran

I adored Mme. Legrée’s class. She was not as keen on smaller details and spoke a lot about her stylistic preferences. She also made sure that dance was good for our body. During my first class with her, she stopped the class to correct someone’s arabesque because their back was too squared. She asked why they would do that and half the class responded that they thought that was the goal. She was shocked and yelled “mais non! La danse est naturelle. Rien ne devrait être abnormal pour ton corps sauf le premier position.” Mme. Legrée also corrected me on stylistic things, particularly on how I do my pirouettes. With her class and Mr. David’s, I deduced that the purpose of the French style was to be as flowing as possible, particularly with their use of the arm. In plie, one changes the arm more than in other techniques. For pirouettes, Mme. Legrée would ask me to “wind up” in order to continue the movement. I made the same deduction in Mme. Kamionka’s course.

Alexia studied at the Sweet Briar College Junior Year in Paris.

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