Neither Friars nor Conquistadors: the Other Spanish Presence in the US

Children of Spanish migrant farmworkers, near Vacaville, California. c. 1925

Children of Spanish migrant farmworkers, near Vacaville, California. c. 1925?
Photo courtesy of Mike Muñoz.

A glimpse into the little known history of the tens of thousands of Spanish peasants and workers who, in the late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century, emigrated to the United States, settling in tightly-knit enclaves all over the United States. These men and women were neither friars nor conquistadors; indeed, one could say that they were the victims of the inequities generated over centuries in Spain itself by Spain’s imperial system.

Talk by James Fernández, New York University
Griffin 3, Nov. 11, 6:30 – 7:30

Picnic of Spanish immigrants, Cleveland, Ohio, 4 July, 1930.

Picnic of Spanish immigrants, Cleveland, Ohio, 4 July, 1930. Photo courtesy of Laura Goyanes.

Spanish immigrants aboard the SS Aquitania, 1926

Spanish immigrants aboard the SS Aquitania, 1926. Photo courtesy of Joe Losada.